Lessons Learned: A Reminder of Where We Came

Exodus the book is synonymous with the exodus (the journey), and rarely do people remember anything else. Both movies, The Ten Commandments and The Prince of Egypt, end after Moses is given the Ten Commandments (the former shows the ordeal with the golden calf, while the latter does not). Neither discuss the priesthood or tabernacle, which are also discussed heavily in Exodus. Also, in addition to Ten Commandments, we see other laws which are rarely discussed.

Introduction

Exodus the book is synonymous with the exodus (the journey), and rarely do people remember anything else. Both movies, The Ten Commandments and The Prince of Egypt, end after Moses is given the Ten Commandments (the former shows the ordeal with the golden calf, while the latter does not). Neither discuss the priesthood or tabernacle, which are also discussed heavily in Exodus. Also, in addition to Ten Commandments, we see other laws which are rarely discussed. Many overlook these portions of the book in favor of the action-packed showdown between God and the pharaoh or because they feel information on the old covenant doesn't pertain to them any more. Yet, the connections between Moses' day and now are so numerous I couldn't keep track of them all.

God vs. Pharaoh

God's conversation with Pharaoh, through Moses, shows us a lot about today's society. Moses performs a miracle by God's hand, then Pharaoh has his magicians imitate God's miracle, to which point Pharaoh denies God. This leads Pharaoh's heart to harden to the point than when the magicians can no longer imitate God, Pharaoh is delusional and unwilling to admit that God is all powerful and in charge. This happens all around us with science today. Scientists replicate God's majesty in theories and laws, but they can't recreate His actions. People think they are being smart by following the scientists, just as Pharaoh thought he was being smart. However, there will come a time when it is too late to turn back (after the mark of the beast is issued) and many will be victim to falling for these false substitutions for God. I believe this is part of the reason God gives us this full story with so much detail. Not just to remind the Israelites what He did for them but to warn us of our future.

Priesthood/Tabernacle

Today, we have churches, none of which can compare to the splendor of the Tabernacle. In fact, Churches are not like the Tabernacle at all, even though some churches put the word tabernacle in their name. For starters, only the clean and holy were allowed on the premises and only the priests were allowed beyond the vail where God dwelled. While modern churches have pulpits where only the preacher is allowed to stand, the choir often stands behind the preacher and there is no vail that separates this area. Similarly, while priests were responsible for knowing and maintaining the law, nowhere in Exodus does it say that the priest was to give sermons and especially not from the Tabernacle. Teaching was a duty ascribed to the disciples and apostles in the New Testament. In Exodus, we see the priest's duty was to atone for the people's sins—a duty Christ took over after His resurrection from the crucifixion. Exodus' description of the priesthood explains why we need Jesus. Before He took over the office of High Priest, one would have had to consult the priest at the temple in Jerusalem which is now gone and previously could have been quite a distance to travel. The priest had to atone for your sins because only the priest was worthy to speak with God. However, the priest had to atone for his on sins as well, and if a priest was corrupt (like Aaron's sons Nadab and Abihu—see Leviticus 10) the whole community was doomed. We don't have this problem with Jesus, as He is perfect; He is always available where ever we are, and He is never defiled. We have no use for priests under the new covenant, but Exodus reminds us of why the new covenant is special.

Reflections on Sin

Since most churches teach that the law was abolished on the cross (see The Law for more details), only the Ten Commandments are used as a basis for sin—remember sin is disobedience of the law.[1][2] It is easy (for me at least) to step down the Ten Commandments and think I have committed no sins. It is much harder to look at the other laws listed in Exodus (and Leviticus) and maintain that I have not committed sins. It is a great reminder of all the wrong Jesus took upon himself at the cross.

Egyptology

Reading about the Israelites' journey to and from Egypt made me curious about the history of Egypt. Some of the information I have researched is presented in the posts on Exodus as they apply, more research is likely to appear as I continue on.

Reference

  1. Romans 4:15
  2. 1 John 3:4

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About

Author Image Author Image I love reading the Word of God. With prayer God's Word reveals so much: from comfort to temperance, from perspective to affirmation. Digging into the depths of the Word, cross-referencing history, language and time differences, is a passion of mine. In March of 2015 I decided to go back through the Bible doing an in depth study on each section I read. Eventually I decided to share my journal of notes as I partake in this journey. I hope you are blessed by God and inspired to pursue a deeper relationship with Him. I love reading and learning about God, nature, and science. I am interested in how it all connects. The Creator's fingerprints are all over his creation. We can learn so much about Him and how we came to be by exploring the world around us. Join me as I explore the world and draw closer to the One who created it all.
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