Isaiah 7: Born of a Virgin
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Isaiah 7: Born of a Virgin

Original Publication Date
April 1, 2018
Updated
Jan 21, 2023 2:40 PM
Tags
IsaiahChapter StudyMessianic ProphecyMary & JosephMatthewLukeMiracle Birth
Bible References
Isaiah 7:14-16
Status
Done
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Table of Contents
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This page was originally posted on my Blogger version of the blog on April 1, 2018 The content below has a few minor tweaks for clarity, and additional references, and some updated information.

Introduction

Miraculous births are one of God's favorite signs it seems. Isaac, Jacob (and Esau), Joseph, Samuel, Samson's mother, and John the Baptist were all born miraculously. Each of their mothers had trouble conceiving and only through God's help were able to have children. In each case, that child became someone of great importance. Miracle births weren't really new to the Israelites, so it would seem that God would have do to something even more miraculous to bring in the Messiah.

We all know that Jesus was born of a virgin; that's part of the miracle of His birth. It makes sense that God would choose this route because if a woman was intimate with her husband, everyone would assume it was the husband's child, including the woman and her husband. However, if you knew you were a virgin, and you became pregnantβ€”especially during a time when IVF wasn't a thingβ€”you really have no choice but to believe this is a miracle from God. Isaiah, which has the most Messianic prophecies of any book, told us that the Messiah would be born of a virgin.

In Isaiah 7:14, God tells Ahaz (through Isaiah) that He will give a sign in the form of a virgin conceiving a child. This is the verse most point to as the prophecy that Jesus would be born of a virgin. Let's talk about it.

Is The Passage About Jesus?

14 Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.Β 15 Butter and honey shall he eat, that he may know to refuse the evil, and choose the good.Β 16 For before the child shall know to refuse the evil, and choose the good, the land that thou abhorrest shall be forsaken of both her kings.

Of course, if you really pay attention or if you've ever had a conversation with someone who doubts, you might have some doubts about whether this verse is actually about Jesus. Let's break it down piece by piece.

Controversy Over the Word Virgin

The original Hebrew word, translated to the English "virgin," is almah. Many people argue that this word actually means young woman or woman of marriageable age. Unlike today, women who were unmarried back then would have been assumed to be virgins, so a word meaning single woman would have been practically synonymous with virgin. If almah meant young woman of marriageable age instead of virgin, there would be a very small chance that woman described was not a virgin...

As usual, I decided to dig deeper into the meaning of the word. Sources disagree as to whether the word does or doesn't mean "virgin." Some scholars assert that the word almah never occurs in reference to maiden who is not a virgin.[1] Others suggest that only the word betulah should be translated as virgin. [2]

Meaning of the Word Almah

Almah is used 7 times in the Bible, sometimes it translated as maid, other times as virgin. Many Bible scholars who are believers, assert that there is no place where the word is used that designates a woman that is not a virgin.[1] However, there are probably just as many who claim this is false.

Those who assert that almah is used to mean non virgin cite Proverbs 30:18-20. In this passage, almah is translated to maid. The consensus of interpretation for the passage is that all the things of the things being compared leave no evidence. Since almah is used to describe the woman who is presumably having sex with a man, people argue that almah could not mean virgin, because when virginity is lost, there is evidence left in the bed.

I find this argument by itself to be lacking. For one, a non-virginal woman can still end up bleeding during sex. For two, technically the proverb doesn't mention the bed or the sheets. Think about the example that relates the eagle and the sky. If you look at the sky after an eagle has flown by, you won't see any evidence in the sky, assuming the eagle is no longer flying you can't tell by looking at the eagle either. However, you may assume an eagle has flown through the sky at some point and that the eagle has flown through a sky. Now let's look back at the man and woman. Just as the proverb only mentions eagle and sky, the proverb only mentions the man and the woman. If you see either after the fact you may assume something has happened, but you can't know for sure. If you include the sheets of the bed in the discussion you might include the wake left behind the ship or the fact that the ship is wet...

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Reading this passage again in 2023, I have no idea how people are getting that interpretation. Reading it today, I see the passage is talking about mysterious things, or miraculous thingβ€”things that actually point back to YHWH as creator. These are things that can’t really be explained. If anything, I would argue it as a statement that the author had never had sex with a woman and that was why he didn’t know the way of a man with a maid…

The next verse (Proverbs 30:20), however, does lend credence to the argument. The proverb goes straight into talking about an adulterous woman, suggesting that the almah in verse 19 had sex with someone other than her husband. Many who refute that almah is synonymous with virgin interpret the verse to mean she isn't a virgin in the moment, but I'm still not sure you can make that assumption. It could be referring to her losing her virginity outside of marriage. This would be something highly unexpected (verse 18 says it's something the writer does not know or understand). Adam Clarke offers an interpretation that reminds us that in this scenario, the man and woman would both want to hide any evidence of the act since they are not married.[5] However it doesn't prove without a shadow of doubt that the woman was not a virgin before the act.

New Testament Understanding

In Matthew 1:22-23, Matthew quotes Isaiah 7 in reference to Jesus' virgin birth. He uses the Greek word parthenos (παρθΡνο΢), which definitely means virgin. Non believers who argue that almah doesn't necessarily mean virgin claim Matthew misquoted Isaiah. I ask this: if almah doesn't mean virgin and doesn't strongly imply virgin, why would the disciples go through the trouble of faking a virgin birth?

Think about this: if Jesus wasn't born of a virgin, He still wasn't Joseph's son. When Joseph finds out Mary is having a baby (which he perceives as her not being a virgin), he's angry and initially calls off the wedding. Though it was already disgraceful to have sex before marriage, it would have been considered even more disgraceful for Joseph to marry a woman he did not have sex with who could be proven not a virgin. If Joseph was the one who had sex with Mary, he wouldn't have been shocked and would have probably just pushed the wedding date up to cover their tracks. Since a man who has sex with a virgin is supposed to marry her, this would still fall in line with Biblical doctrine (Exodus 22:16). However, the fact that Joseph was shocked and initially rejected Mary, suggests it was not his child. If they were engaged during the time she became pregnant, she would have had to commit adultery (which was still punishable by death). If they weren't engaged when she became pregnant, it would have been obvious to the people that this baby was not Joseph's, which would have been quite the embarrassment for Joseph.

Only the latter rationale would give the couple a reason to lie about a virgin birth, but to claim your child is the Messiah and actually have Him fulfill the prophecies? That's a bit much. I also think it would be more likely for Joseph to go with his first instinct and simply dump Mary, not make up a virgin birth. Furthermore, if almah didn't mean virgin, the Jews would not have expected a virgin birth for their Messiah. Not only would it have been unnecessary to those following Christ, but it would have been easy for Matthew to ignore the quote all together. After all, if we translate almah to maid, Isaiah 7:14 becomes an unnecessary statement. Sure, an old woman could have a babyβ€”like Sarahβ€”but a young woman having a child isn't out of the ordinary. As I type this sentence, there is probably a young woman giving birth to a child somewhere and there's a 50% chance that child is male. There's nothing remarkable about the prediction. Especially when Mary doesn't name Jesus Emmanuel... Yet, Luke also confirms the virgin birth in Luke 1:27, 34. Why?

I found an article that seems to blend both arguments to form a rationale for the "mix-up." The author admits that almah is to virgin as teenager is to high schoolerβ€”not 100% accurate but spot on for the most part. Where their explanation become interesting is in the assertion that it doesn't matter, because according to them, Matthew wasn't saying that Mary was the young woman spoken of in Isaiah. The author explains that Matthew quoted the Greek mistranslation on purpose, merely to draw parallels between what Isaiah meant back then versus what was happening at present. Essentially, the author claims that Matthew was merely confirming that Jesus' birth was a sign (just as the birth mentioned in Isaiah was a sign) for the people.[4] In Isaiah, this sign is for Ahaz (King of Judah) to prove that the kingdom will stand. Similarly, Jesus' birth was a sign to believers (kings and priests of God's kingdomβ€”Revelation 1:6) to prove that His kingdom will stand. I'll talk a little more about the fulfillment aspect later in the post.

Immanuel

Immanuel or Emmanuel, means "God with us" and was the name meant to be given to the child. People often use this name to refer to Jesus, such as in the song "O Come, O Come Emmanuel." Although this was not Jesus' given name, He is literally "God with us." The name only appears 3 times in the Bible: during the prophecy in Isaiah 7:14, in Isaiah 8:8, and in Matthew 1:23. None of these verses explicitly show a son being named Immanuel, though Matthew seems to be connecting the prophecy to Jesus.

Eating Butter and Honey

The next part of the prophecy describes the diet of the child. Isaiah 7:15 tells us that the child will eat butter and honey which somehow tells him to choose good over evil. My first question was why not bread and water? The Word of God is often referred to or associated with bread (Matthew 4:4), while life is associated with water (John 4:14). Yet, here we're talking about butter and honey; what do they represent?

Diet Matters

Before we jump into exactly what the butter and honey represent, I want to point out something critical. We live in a society that has us believing as long as we do things in moderation, it's ok. Maybe we drink in moderation or eat foods we know are bad for us in moderation. We assume these things don't harm us because we don't do them often, but we're still polluting the temple that is our body.

In school, my teachers used to always tell us to get a good night's rest and eat a good breakfast before a big test. Studies have shown that healthy eating habits correlate to high academic achievement.[6][7] It makes sense logically because the food we eat fuels our brain. If we fuel our brain with garbage, it won't perform at an optimum level.

There are no scientific studies to translate this to moral action because morality isn't really scientific, it's spiritual. So I can't cite studies that verify what we consume affects our ability to decide between good and evil, but I can provide anecdotal evidence. It wasn't until I cut out pork and shellfish (unclean meats) from my diet that I really took off in my relationship with Christ. Before I was kinda jogging in place, but now I'm sprinting toward Him. God spends a lot of time telling us what we can and cannot eat, in fact he goes into this before sin even enters the world. I'm pretty sure it's a big deal.

Symbolism

Butter and honey are almost always used to mean something good in the Bible, unlike leaven which is often equated with sin. Later in Isaiah 7:22, we are told that the abundance of milk creates the abundance of butter. Although this passage is in the midst of describing the destruction of Judah, we have to remember that without a healthy source, there can be no milk. Whether the source is a goat or a cow, the animal must be pregnant to produce milk. This means that in order to have an abundance of milk, you must have at least 3 cows (or goats): the female providing the milk, the male who impregnating her, and the calf to be born. In those days, you couldn't just run to the store and buy such a thing. As such, butter sounds like a luxury item. I don't think God would be saying the baby will be bathed in luxury to know good from evil; that doesn't seem logical.

I found an article that goes through each Bible verse in which butter and honey are mentioned to determine a possible spiritual meaning for the words. They determined that butter was hidden knowledge of God, honey was the law and Word of God, and the act of eating symbolizes studying.[8] I like that they went to the Bible to define the meaning, but I'm not sure I agree with their interpretation. The part I'm really not sure about is the "hidden knowledge of God." I can see honey being the Word of God, particularly since Revelation 10:9-10 (also in prophecy) describes a specific book as being sweet like honey.

Something that catches my attention is that fact that The Promised Land was known as the land of milk and honey, or a land overflowing with milk and honey. Given this, perhaps it is the promises of God that the child is consuming. If the child takes his place among God's people and continues in faith (which would include studying the Word and law of God), he is within the covenant and set to reap the promises of God. Furthermore, the entire sign is a reminder of the promise God is making to Ahaz that Syria will not destroy them.

Although this isn't an explanation of the prophecy, I want to point out another interesting connection. Let's go back to Revelation 10:9-10. John is predicting an end time event in which he eats a book that is at first sweet like honey, but bitter in his belly. Interestingly, Judah shared a similar fate. The child was a sign that Syria and Israel would not defeat Judah. Thus, in childhood (i.e., the beginning), everything was working in Judah's favor (i.e., sweet like honey). However, not too very long after, Judah suffered the same fate as Israel, only instead of the Assyrians defeating them, it was the Babylonians. They would go on to experience the bitterness of famine and defeat.

Timing

For before the child shall know to refuse the evil, and choose the good, the land that thou abhorrest shall be forsaken of both her kings.

One of the most important things given in the prophecy is the timeline. God is sending this sign to let Ahaz know that they have nothing to fear from Syria and Israel, so it makes sense that he would give him a time period for which the danger would cease. Earlier in the prophecy, God tells Ahaz that the kingdom of Israel would be completing broken within 65 years (i.e. cease to exist), but here, God is saying that before this child is fully grown, the kings from both of these nations will be taken off their thrones. The destruction of the northern kingdom happened exactly in that manner; first the king was done away with, and slowly the people were forced into other locations until the 10 tribes were no more.

Fulfillment

So, how exactly was the prophecy fulfilled? Clearly, Isaiah meant for a child to be born soon. Does this mean that Jesus isn't Immanuel? Or does it mean there was a double prophecy? Or is it something entirely different?

If you skip to Isaiah 8:1-4, you'll see another prophecy concerning a child to be bornβ€”Mahershalalhashbaz. God says that before the child can all out for his mother and father, Samaria (Israel) and Damascus (Syria) will fall. Mahershalalhashbaz is Isaiah's biological son and seems to fit the prophecy.

Does Jesus also fulfill this? How do the events line up? It is true that while Jesus is very young, Herod the Great is killed, i.e. disposed, but Rome doesn't cease to be a threat. On a spiritual note, however, Jesus does defeat our primary enemies: death and sin. His birth was a sign of victory. Further, another destruction of Judah does come shortly after Jesus' resurrection. Spiritually speaking, a final destruction await everyone and like in Isaiah's prophecy, there will be a remnant that is saved. There's also the fact that Jesus is literally Immanuel...

I believe the prophecy is a double prophecy. When a seed was promised to Abraham, Isaac was the initial fulfillment, but Jesus was the ultimate fulfillment. When a king was prophesied to come out of the line of Judah, David was the initial fulfillment, but Jesus was the ultimate fulfillment. In both cases, there were things that didn't quite fit for the initial fulfillment: Isaac didn't defeat the serpent and David didn't rule forever. The same is true for Isaiah's son who is the initial fulfillment of Isaiah 7:14; he isn't named Immanuel and he isn't born of a literal virgin (though she may have been a virgin just before she conceived the child; there's no guarantee that the mother of Mahershalalhashbaz is the same woman who gave birth to the son mentioned in Isaiah 7:3). However, Jesus fulfills all of these: He is born of a literal virgin; He is a sign of the coming victory and the coming defeat; and He is literally Immanuel (God is with us).

References and Footnotes

  1. "Strong's H5959 - `almah".Β Blue Letter Bible; visited March 2018
  2. Tovia Singer. "Does the Hebrew Word Alma Really Mean β€œVirgin”?".Β Outreach Judaism; visited March 2018
  3. "3933. parthenos".Β Bible Hub; visited March 2018
  4. Joel M. Hoffman. "Was There Really a Virgin Birth in the Bible?".Β Bible Odyssey; visited March 2018
  5. Adam Clarke. "Proverbs 30:19 Commentary".Β Studylight; visited March 2018
  6. Lars Lien. "s breakfast consumption related to mental distress and academic performance in adolescents?".Β Public Health Nutrition, 10(4); pg. 422–428. 2007
  7. Howard Taras. "Nutrition and Student Performance at School".Β Journal of School Health. 75(6); pg. 199-213. July 2005
  8. Hystar.Β Butter and Honey Shall He Eat Isaiah 7:15".Β EZ Bible Study. August 28, 2008
  9. "Language of God Chapter 8".Β Aletheia; visited March 2018

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IsaiahChapter StudyEphraimManassehMessianic ProphecySatanJudgementRepentance and Forgiveness
πŸ“–
Isaiah 5: The 6 Woes
IsaiahChapter StudyMetaphorParableJudgementMoneyFalse Deities and ProphetsProphecy
πŸ“–
Isaiah 3: Judgment of Israel (Pt. 2)
IsaiahChapter StudyFalse Deities and ProphetsWomenProphecyJudgement
πŸ“–
Isaiah 4: Judgment of Israel (Pt. 3)
IsaiahChapter StudyWomenRelationshipsJerusalemSymbolismProphecy
πŸ“–
Isaiah 2: Judgment of Israel
IsaiahChapter StudyJudgementTempleProphecyFalse Deities and Prophets
πŸ“–
Isaiah 1: Judgment for Israel is Coming
IsaiahChapter StudyCaptivityRepentance and ForgivenessJudgement
πŸ“–
Genesis 1 & 2: Creation
CreationAdamEveScienceGarden of EdenGenesisChapter StudySabbath
πŸ“–
Exodus 1: A New King
MosesEgyptGenocideExodusChapter Study
πŸ“
Cross Referencing the Books of Law
DeuteronomyNumbersLeviticusExodusGenesisLaw
πŸ“–
Deuteronomy 31-34: The Final Address
DeuteronomyChapter Study
πŸ“–
Deuteronomy 28: The Curse of Israel & The Black Israelite Theory
DeuteronomyChapter StudyRacismIsraelGenealogy
πŸ“–
Deuteronomy 27-30: The Third Address
DeuteronomyChapter StudyBlessings & CursesCovenant
πŸ“–
Deuteronomy 5-26: The Second Address (Part 3)
DeuteronomyChapter StudyTithesRelationshipsServants and SlavesSexual AssaultWomenCommandments
πŸ“–
Deuteronomy 5-26: The Second Address (Part 2)
DeuteronomyChapter StudyFalse Deities and ProphetsLeviPriesthoodIsraelJusticeJudgementTithesClean and Unclean
πŸ“–
Deuteronomy 5-26: The Second Address (Part 1)
DeuteronomyChapter StudyCommandmentsLawIsraelLeviFalse Deities and ProphetsCovenant
πŸ“–
Numbers 26-27: The Second Census
NumbersChapter StudyMosesJoshua (person)Leadership
πŸ“–
Numbers 25: Idolatry & Israel
NumbersChapter StudyFalse Deities and ProphetsMoabRelationships
πŸ“–
Numbers 30: Vows
NumbersChapter Study
πŸ“–
Numbers 34: Boundaries of Israel
NumbersChapter Study
πŸ“–
Numbers 20-21: The Journey Continues
NumbersChapter StudyEdomCanaanSymbolismMoab
πŸ“–
Numbers 20: Moses Sins
NumbersChapter StudySymbolismMosesAaronWater
πŸ“–
Numbers 20: Miriam’s Death
NumbersChapter Study
πŸ“–
Numbers 19: Purification
NumbersChapter StudyDeathClean and UncleanSacrifice
πŸ“–
Numbers 16-18: Rebellion
NumbersChapter StudyIntercessory PrayerAaronPriesthoodTithesDeath
πŸ“–
Numbers 13-14: Scouting
NumbersChapter StudyJoshua (person)CalebNephilim and Giants
πŸ“–
Numbers 15: Reminders
NumbersChapter Study
πŸ“–
Numbers 10-12: From Sinai to Paran
NumbersChapter StudyMosesAaronMiriamEthiopiaRelationshipsFood and Diet
πŸ“–
Numbers 7: Tribal Princes’ Offerings
NumbersChapter StudySacrificeTemple
πŸ“–
Numbers 8-10: Instructions
NumbersChapter StudyLeviPassover
πŸ“–
Numbers 5: A Few Laws and a Test
NumbersChapter StudyLawAdultery
πŸ“–
Numbers 3-4: Levite Duties
NumbersChapter Study
πŸ“–
Numbers 6: The Nazarite Vow
NumbersChapter StudySamsonJohn the BaptistOaths and VowsSamuelFastingClean and UncleanPaul
πŸ“–
Numbers 1-3: The First Census
NumbersChapter StudyAngelsIsraelDanJudahEphraimLeviRueben
πŸ“–
Numbers 35: Special Cities
NumbersChapter StudyMurderPovertyLeviRepentance and Forgiveness
πŸ“–
Numbers 36: Female Inheritance
NumbersChapter Study
πŸ“–
Leviticus 21-22: More on Priests
LeviticusChapter StudyPriesthoodLeviRelationships
πŸ“–
Leviticus 19-20: Righteousness
LeviticusChapter StudyAppearanceCommandmentsLawSacrificeAdulteryWitchcraftFood and DietFeasts & Holy DaysJustice
πŸ“–
Leviticus 17-18: Immorality
LeviticusChapter StudySacrificeFalse Deities and ProphetsSexual Imorality
πŸ“–
Leviticus 16: Atonement
LeviticusChapter StudySacrificeFeasts & Holy DaysSabbath
πŸ“–
Leviticus 14-15: Unclean Buildings & Unclean Flesh
LeviticusChapter StudyClean and Unclean
πŸ“–
Leviticus 13-14: Skin Diseases & Leprosy
LeviticusChapter Study
πŸ“–
Leviticus 11-12: Clean and Unclean
LeviticusChapter StudyClean and UncleanFood and Diet
πŸ“–
Leviticus 6-7: Offering Laws
LeviticusChapter StudySacrificeLawAaronPriesthood
πŸ“–
Leviticus 8-10: The Priesthood
LeviticusChapter StudyPriesthoodSacrifice
πŸ“–
Leviticus 1-6: Offerings
LeviticusChapter StudySacrificeOaths and Vows
πŸ“–
Leviticus 23: Feasts & Holy Days
LeviticusChapter StudyFeasts & Holy DaysPassoverDay of AtonementTabernaclesPentecost
πŸ“–
Leviticus 24-25: Expectations & Appropriate Behavior
LeviticusChapter StudyFeasts & Holy DaysBlasphemyLawServants and SlavesTemple
πŸ“–
Leviticus 26-27: Consequences
LeviticusChapter Study
πŸ“
Earrings, Piercings, and Christians
LeviticusAppearance
πŸ‘€
Aaron
AaronExodusCharacter StudyLeviticusNumbersDeuteronomy
πŸ‘€
Moses
MosesExodusCharacter StudyLeviticusNumbersDeuteronomy
πŸ“
S.O.A.P. Method
ExodusTithesMoneyStudy the Word
❓
Would You Rather?: Plagues vs. Famine
Would You RatherPlaguesExodus
πŸ“
Do Not Take the LORD’s Name in Vain
CommandmentsDeuteronomyExodusNames of GodBlasphemy
πŸ“
Do Not Steal
DeuteronomyExodusCommandmentsLawTheft
πŸ“
Do Not Covet
CommandmentsExodusDeuteronomyCovet
πŸ“–
Exodus 35-40: The Tabernacle & Priesthood Pt. 2
ExodusChapter Study
πŸ“–
Exodus 33-35: Repentance & The Second Set of Tablets
ExodusChapter StudyRepentance and ForgivenessClean and UncleanIsraelIntercessory PrayerFeasts & Holy DaysMoses
πŸ“–
Exodus 32: The Golden Calf
ExodusChapter StudyFalse Deities and ProphetsMosesAaronCommandmentsRepentance and ForgivenessIntercessory Prayer
πŸ“–
Exodus 28-31: Priesthood
ExodusChapter StudyAaronPriesthoodSacrifice
πŸ“–
Exodus 24-27: The Tabernacle
ExodusChapter StudyTempleMosesLeadership
πŸ“–
Exodus 23: Feasts
ExodusChapter StudyFeasts & Holy DaysPentecostTabernaclesUnleavened Bread
πŸ“
Do Not Kill
CommandmentsLawMurderAngerExodusDeuteronomy
πŸ“
Honor Thy Mother and Father
CommandmentsLawRelationshipsHamDeuteronomyExodus
πŸ“
No Other Gods
CommandmentsLawFalse Deities and ProphetsExodusDeuteronomy
πŸ“–
Exodus 21-23: Expansion of the Law
Chapter StudyExodusPovertyRacismMoneyLawWitchcraftMurderAnimals
πŸ“–
Exodus 18-20: God’s Commandments
ExodusChapter StudyMosesAaronCommandmentsSinaiFireLeadershipLaw
πŸ“–
Exodus 14-17: Leaving Egypt
ExodusChapter StudyEgyptPhilistineMosesMiriamWomenWildernessWaterAmalakitesNames of GodFire
πŸ“–
Exodus 5-13: The Ten Plagues (and Passover)
PlaguesEgyptExodusMosesAaronPassoverFeasts & Holy DaysChapter StudyGenocide
πŸ“–
Exodus 2-4: Raising Up A Leader
MosesAaronMidianEgyptMessiahExodusChapter StudyFire
πŸ“
The Creation and Purpose of Women
WomenEveGenesisGarden of EdenYouTube
πŸ“
Introduction to God
Lessons LearnedGenesis
❓
Would You Rather?: Fatherly Treatment
Would You RatherEdomJacobJosephGenesisRelationshipsTheft
πŸ‘€
The Life of Leah
LeahJacobGenesisRelationshipsLeviJudahZebulunIssacharDinahSimeonRuebenCharacter StudyRachel
πŸ‘€
Joseph, son of Jacob
JosephMiracle BirthMental HealthGenesisCharacter Study
πŸ‘€
Dinah
Character StudyGenesisWomenSexual AssaultDinahJacobLeahLeviSimeonYouTube
πŸ“–
Genesis 27-36: Jacob & Esau, Two Nations
GenesisChapter StudyWomenJacobLeahEdomRachelTithesFalse Deities and ProphetsDinahSexual AssaultCircumcisionLeviSimeonGenocideTheft
πŸ“–
Genesis 24-26: Isaac, the Second Patriarch
GenesisChapter StudyIsaacRebekahJacobEdomIshmaelCovenantGenealogyPhilistine
πŸ“–
Genesis 11-23: Abraham and the Destruction of Sodom & Gomorrah
GenesisChapter StudyAbrahamSarahJudgementLotHagarIshmaelCircumcisionSexual ImoralityIsaacMoab
πŸ“–
Genesis 6-9: Noah and the Flood
GenesisChapter StudyNoahWaterJudgementCovenantClean and UncleanAnimalsNephilim and Giants
πŸ“–
Genesis 4 & 5: The Progeny of Adam
GenealogyAdamEveCainAbelNoahEnochGenesisChapter Study
πŸ“–
Genesis 4: Cain and Abel
CainAbelSacrificeMurderJealousyAngerGenesisChapter Study
✍🏽
Allegory
Literary DevicesAllegoryGarden of EdenGenesisFeasts & Holy DaysTempleEsther
πŸ“
You Are What You Eat: Introduction
Food and DietClean and Unclean
πŸ“
R.E.A.P. Method
Study the WordPsalms
πŸ“
Keep the Sabbath Holy
SabbathCommandments
πŸ“
Homosexuality in the Bible
LeviticusSexual ImoralitySexual AssaultRelationshipsLawCommandmentsLove
✍🏽
Poetic Justice
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Anthology
Literary DevicesAnthology
❓
Would You Rather?: Ask or Disobey
Would You RatherEstherDaniel
πŸ“
F.E.A.S.T. Method
PsalmsStudy the WordFaith
πŸ“–
2 Samuel 11-12: David and Bathsheba
2 SamuelChapter StudyRelationshipsAdulteryJudgementDavidMurder
πŸ“–
Jeremiah 1: Jeremiah’s Call
JeremiahChapter StudyDreams and VisionsProphecyJosiah
πŸ“–
Daniel 2: Nebuchadnezzar’s Dream
DanielChapter StudyBabylonNebuchadnezzarProphecyPersiaRomePapal RomeDreams and Visions
πŸ“–
Ezra 9-10: Confessions of Sin
EzraChapter StudyRelationships
πŸ“–
Ezra 5-6: Darius’ Decree
EzraChapter StudyPassoverTemplePersia
πŸ“–
Ezra 7-8: Introducing Ezra
EzraChapter StudyLeviTemplePersia
πŸ“–
Ezra 1: Cyrus’ Decree
EzraChapter StudyBabylonCaptivityTemple
πŸ‘€
David
Character StudyRuth1 Samuel2 Samuel1 Kings2 Kings1 Chronicles2 ChroniclesPsalms
πŸ“–
Revelation 2-3: The 7 Churches
RevelationChapter Study
πŸ“–
Nehemiah 7-11: Restoration of Jerusalem
NehemiahChapter StudyTithesGenealogyRepentance and ForgivenessSalvationFeasts & Holy Days
πŸ“–
Esther 8-10: Purim
EstherChapter StudyPurimFeasts & Holy Days
πŸ“–
Nehemiah 12-13: Dedication of the Wall
NehemiahChapter Study
πŸ“–
Ezra 2: Those Who Returned
Chapter StudyEzraGenealogy
πŸ“–
Nehemiah 4-6: Opposition
NehemiahChapter StudyMoneySatan
πŸ“–
Nehemiah 3: Rebuilding the Wall
NehemiahChapter StudyJerusalemWomenMessianic Prophecy
πŸ“–
Nehemiah 2: Back to Jerusalem
NehemiahChapter StudyApologeticsJerusalemLeadershipPersia
πŸ“–
Nehemiah 1: Who is Nehemiah?
Chapter StudyNehemiahJudahPersiaCaptivityJerusalemLeadership
πŸ“–
Esther 3-5: The Threat to the Jews
EstherChapter StudyWomenFastingRacismGenocide
πŸ“–
Esther 2: The Rise of Queen Esther
EstherChapter StudyBenjaminWomenPersia
πŸ“
Do Not Bear False Witness
CommandmentsFalse Deities and ProphetsLaw
πŸ“–
Judges 1: Judah’s Conquest
Chapter StudyJudgesCanaanJudah
πŸ“–
Judges 2: Provoking God
JudgesChapter StudyFalse Deities and ProphetsCommandmentsCanaan
πŸ“–
Judges 3: Othniel and Ehud
JudgesChapter StudyCanaanFalse Deities and ProphetsRelationshipsCaptivityBenjaminMoabAmalakites
πŸ“–
Judges 4-5: Deborah, Jael, and Barak
JudgesChapter StudyDeborahWomenLeadership
πŸ“–
Judges 6-8: Gideon
JudgesChapter StudyManassehMidianAmalakitesHoly SpiritEphraim
πŸ‘€
The Unnamed Concubine
Character StudyJudgesWomenSexual Assault
πŸ“–
Judges 9-10: Abimelech
JudgesChapter Study
πŸ“–
Judges 10-12: Jephthath
JudgesChapter StudyAmmonEphraimOaths and Vows
πŸ“–
Judges 13-16: Samson
JudgesChapter StudyRelationshipsSamsonWomenPhilistineOaths and VowsDan
πŸ“–
Judges 17-18: Micah and the Tribe of Dan
JudgesChapter StudyDanMoneyLeviFalse Deities and ProphetsTheft
πŸ“–
Acts 1-5: The Early Days of the Church
Chapter StudyActsCainAbelDiscipleshipLyingProphecyMoneyThe ChurchPeterTheft
πŸ“–
Acts 9: From Saul to Paul
ActsChapter StudyPaulRepentance and ForgivenessHoly SpiritTheft
πŸ“–
Judges 19-21: A Call to War
JudgesChapter StudySexual AssaultWomenLeviBenjamin
πŸ“–
2 Samuel 21-24: Contradictions on David's Final Days?
2 SamuelChapter StudyDavidSaulDoctrinePhilistine
πŸ“–
2 Samuel 19-20: Israel and Judah
2 SamuelChapter StudyDavidDivision of Israel
πŸ“–
2 Samuel 5-10: David’s Military Success
2 SamuelChapter StudyDavidRelationshipsMessianic Prophecy
πŸ“–
2 Samuel 1-4: After Saul’s Death
2 SamuelChapter StudySaulDavidDivision of Israel
πŸ“–
Acts 16: Timothy Was Biracial…Sort Of
ActsChapter StudyTimothyGenealogyCircumcisionPaulWomenBaptism
πŸ“–
Acts 15: Disagreements in the Church
ActsChapter StudyPaulPeterLeadershipCommandmentsSalvationCircumcisionRepentance and Forgiveness
πŸ“–
Acts 13-14: The First Missionary Journey of Paul
ActsChapter StudyLeadershipThe ChurchPaulGenealogyDiscipleship
πŸ“–
Acts 12: Peter, Rhoda, and Herod
ActsChapter StudyWomenPeterPersecutionRomeHolidayPassover
πŸ“–
Acts 6-8 & 10-11: The Transition
ActsChapter StudyCommunicationPaulLeadershipBaptismThe ChurchPeterEthiopiaFalse Deities and ProphetsSymbolism
πŸ“–
Daniel 1: Taken to Babylon
DanielBabylonCaptivityNebuchadnezzarFastingChapter Study
πŸ“–
Obadiah 1: Woe to Edom
Chapter StudyObadiahEdomProphecy
πŸ“–
Esther 1: The Demise of a Queen
WomenEstherPersiaChapter Study
πŸ“–
Ruth 4: The Legacy
RuthChapter StudyWomenBoazMessiahRahabTamarGenealogy
πŸ“–
Ruth 3: The Redeeming Relative
RelationshipsBoazRuthChapter Study
πŸ“–
Ruth 2: The Fields of Boaz
PovertyRelationshipsBoazRuthChapter StudyAllegoryMessiah
πŸ“–
Ruth 1: In the Land of Moab
Chapter StudyRuthWomenMoabBoazRelationshipsFamine
πŸ‘€
Mediate Like Abigail
Abigail1 SamuelDavidCharacter StudyWomenYouTube
πŸ‘€
Tamar, daughter of David
Character StudyTamarWomenSexual Assault2 Samuel
πŸ‘€
Absalom
2 SamuelCharacter Study
πŸ“–
2 Samuel 13-19: Absalom’s Coup
Chapter Study2 SamuelDavidRelationshipsTamarWomenSexual ImoralitySexual AssaultRepentance and Forgiveness
πŸ“
You Are What You Eat: Colossians 2
Food and DietClean and UncleanColossians
πŸ“
You Are What You Eat: Romans 14
Food and DietClean and UncleanRomans
πŸ“
You Are What You Eat: Acts 10
Food and DietActsPeterDiscipleship
πŸ“
You Are What You Eat: 1 Timothy 4:1-7
1 TimothyTimothyFood and DietClean and Unclean
πŸ“
You Are What You Eat: Mark 7:15
Food and DietClean and UncleanMatthewMark
πŸ“
You Are What You Eat: Isaiah 66
Food and DietClean and UncleanIsaiahProphecy
πŸ“
Why β€˜The Bride of Christ’ is the Perfect Description
RelationshipsRevelationMessiahProphecy
❓
Would You Rather?: Feed vs. Heal
Would You RatherSpiritual GIftsJohnMatthew
❓
Would You Rather?: Marriage vs. Singleness
Would You RatherRelationshipsLoveRepentance and ForgivenessHoseaPaul
❓
Would You Rather?: Rahab vs. Mary
Would You RatherRahabMary & JosephWomen
✍🏽
Theme
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Tragic Hero
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Zoomorphism
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Utopia
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Tragedy
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Tragic Flaw
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Subplot
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Round Character
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Synecdoche
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Symbolism
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Rising Action
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Retorical Question
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Resolution
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Romance
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Plot Twist
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Rebuttal
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Proverb
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Refrain and Repetition
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Plot
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Prologue
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Protagonist
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Pleonasm
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Logos
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Parrhesia
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Personification
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Pathos
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Passive Voice
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Perspective
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Nemesis
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Parallelism
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Omniscient
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Ode
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Non Sequitur
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Parable
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Paradox
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Motif
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Intertextuality
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Narrative
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Narrator
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Juxtaposition
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Metonymy
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Jargon
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Inciting Incident
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Imagery
Literary Devices
✍🏽
In Media Res
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Hyperbole
Literary Devices
✍🏽
Illusion
Literary Devices
πŸ™πŸ½
PSALMS to God is a blog, podcast, and YouTube channel that discusses many topics and issues, always keeping YHWH as the anchor. Hosea 4:6 says β€œMy people are destroyed for lack of knowledge”—here, the aim is to always ask questions and study to find the answers. You can keep up with new content by signing up for the weekly newsletter.

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